Strange fruits: Plum-Headed Parakeets

Whenever I go looking for a particular sub-species, sooner than later, they tend to show up. I had recently written about how much I wanted to see Plum-Headed Parakeets. About a week later, in Kerala, I spotted a large number of them on different occasions. Each one – an apple tart, wrapped in painted cabbage leaves, with wings.

There were so many flying around, from one tree to another in search of food. I wanted to curl into a foetal position by the side of the road and wildly smile until nice people in white coats chaperone me to a happy and well-padded place.

Plum-Headed Parakeet, Kerala
But I wasn’t able to photograph any of them to my heart’s content. Every time I saw them, I began panicking about how gorgeous they looked. There was so much beauty in them that my fingers trembled whenever I tried to click just a photograph.

I could have handled it if it was a single one or just a pair. But there at least 6-8 of them every single time. It was too much for me to handle with care. Even when one separated herself briefly from the flock, I wasn’t able to do her justice. The photographs, except for a few, ended up looking as though they were drugged and had their kidneys stolen.

On the final day, a flock of Plum-Headed Parakeets dropped by to say farewell. There were about four couples. And let’s just say that they won’t be calling me anytime soon to take their family portraits.

I don’t mind at all. Just as long as they keep showing up.

 

 

(Photographs -Thekkady / Kumily)

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12 comments

  1. oh I’m so glad there is someone else like me who has this problem when photographing birds! Really is just luck sometimes, having said that think you have some fabulous shots here and I’m sure they will be in touch for that group photo on their return.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great photographs and blog. Fills me with nostalgia of the time when I had four of them (parrots) hanging around my garden last year when we planted some twenty sunflower pods there. They came like IT professionals on a morning shift: sharp at 6:30, ate ravenously, sitting upside down and picking the right seeds and discarding the unripe ones with a scorn. They were delightful to watch, very interactive. This year common mynas and two quails have made themselves at home with the hummingbirds 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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