Raptors, falcons and rain-fed philosophers

Some need corns and calluses
to take a leap of faith
and start anew; others wouldn’t
dare jump unless they
wore boots sturdy enough
to land on the moon.

I feel intoxicated whenever I see a bird of prey soar high. I have always been fascinated by them. Their dagger-like talons. Anxious mouths with fishhooks for beaks. Beady eyes that boast of razor-sharp vision. And a grace in flight that makes them the ballerinas of the skies.

Black Eagle, Thekkady

A few years ago I first heard that some birds of prey soar above the clouds when it starts to rain. I distinctly remember having my mind blown to smithereens by this piece of information. It was as though they were rising above their problems, letting go of things they were not in control of.

I was inspired by their will to not just survive, but thrive with intelligence and pride. Their strength and fortitude to stay in flight even when unforeseen forces try to bring them down.

Over two years, I have spotted a variety of falcons and raptors. I have showcased a few of them in flight. My camera does not cost more than my television; it barely out-classes a nice pair of cargo pants I have. These photos are nowhere close to being in good enough quality to showcase how magnificent these birds are.  But no matter which part of the world you hail from, there is a chance that a bird of prey might be soaring above you sometime during the day. The next time you spot one, let the moment last a minute longer.

On a different and infinitely more disappointing note, just so that you know, our winged friends have not been spared the slithering hate of discrimination.

The Black Kite is also named the Pariah Kite. The word “pariah” implies an “outcast” or “undesirable” of some sort. In my country’s history, the term was used to define a person of a low caste. There are also the Red-Backed Sea Eagles, which are commonly referred to as Brahminy Kites. The term “Brahmin” refers to a people of high caste.

And we wonder why birds poop on our vehicles.

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41 comments

  1. That’s so cool that they can soar above the clouds, I wonder if they get ‘Airplane Ears’ and have to chew gum to assimilate variables in air pressure?

    When I was at the meditation retreat, I watched them too, flying so much higher than the others, majestically, and then as lightening they would descend on their prey. I always hoped to see an Arial invasion, and felt slightly jarred in my fantasy amongst the peaceful environment.

    Maybe crows and pigeon’s poop on our car when they can’t find our heads, maybe they just want to part us with some luck

    http://glo.com/living/the-meaning-behind-common-superstitions-7020.gallery?photoId=42455

    Liked by 1 person

  2. How glad am I that you repost these gems! I don’t care what you think about your photos, they are amazing. I am always on the lookout for raptors. They positively calm me. It’s equally joyful finding an owl pellet by the creek. It means they are doing their job!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Shannon (big smile) I also post them because I absolutely loathe some of the previous versions. It’s a problem. Hehehe.

      And yes, calming! That’s often the bestest part. The beautiful nothingness and everythingness 0f them all.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks anu, keep stopping by always!

      And yeah it is sickening that our discrimination has entered their world. How fortunate it is that the birds probably have no idea.

      It also applies to Brahminy Mynahs / Starlings too (sigh).

      Like

      1. See, now I feel overwhelmed hearing that (in the nicest way possible).

        I hope the intimidation goes away poof because there’s absolutely no reason to feel that way about birds or even bloggers. I’d like to think of everyone as one giant family humbled by the beauty in birds(big smile)

        Please do keep writing!

        Liked by 1 person

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